Organic Gardening

Container Garden – an update

I’ve been rather busy saving up for my son’s tution so I have been working non-stop.. LOL.. Not that I enjoy snoozing and forget about writing. well, ok “i’m not a writer FINE!” But still there are people who reads my blog so still….. Here is an update of how I SUCCEEDED in container […]

via Container Garden – an update — BeeJustified

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Garden Planning part one: Dirty Talk | picky to plenty

I’ve been under a lot of stress lately. Like a lot. I was in a car accident nearly three months ago and it has turned my world upside down. While the accident wasn’t too serious, thankfully, it was enough to cause me health problems I’ve been dealing with ever since. One way to cope with stress is to do things I love — cook, write from the heart and dream.

There’s something about being up to the elbows in fresh soil that is oddly soothing. Caring for a vegetable garden is a satisfying journey that begins with the dirt. While it’s too early to get my hands dirty (though seed planting begins in only a few short weeks) I can cope with the stress by daydreaming about this year’s gardens.

One of my biggest mistakes in gardening last year was not paying attention to the soil. My raised beds thrived because they had great soil, the newer ones in the front however, terrible. Here on the Niagara Escarpment we have a lovely red clay soil… not so good for growing. While we did add a few yards of soil to the plot and some manure and compost, it was not enough to create an atmosphere where plants would thrive. Case in point, my midget pepper and bean plants which were barely half way up my calf when they reached their maximum height.

via Garden Planning part one: Dirty Talk | picky to plenty.

Kvale leads successful harvest at U of M Morris

Submitted by Jenna Ray

University of Minnesota Morris editor/writer

University of Minnesota, Morris students gathered more than 654 pounds of produce from the campus vegetable garden this harvest season at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center. Led by Garden to Dining Services liaison Peter Kvale of Duluth, the harvest represents another success in Morris’ effort to increase….

Securing Covers on Low Tunnels

Tags: winter gardening, season extension, Cindy Conner, Virginia

 low tunnel-fall greens

Building low tunnels that are about 30 inches tall to protect your crops through weather that is outside of their comfort zone is fairly easy to do using plastic pipe and plastic sheeting. You will find directions for this at Homeplace Earth. The tricky part is securing the covers. I have seen directions to make the cover with enough plastic sheeting on each end to draw it together to tie to a post in the ground. Sometimes the design calls for simply gathering the extra….

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/securing-covers-on-low-tunnels-zbcz1412.aspx#ixzz3LjHXzZSW

Farm fresh from home

A catalogues of vegetables

Garlic is Chandran Chaliyakath’s big test this year. Their wiry, green stems grow out of a couple of plastic cans on his terrace. Last year, he harvested onions. “I got about 20 kgs,” says Chandran who makes metal grills and shutters for a living and grows vegetables for passion. In the past eight years, ever since Chandran moved into his new house in Cheruvannur built on 10 cents of land, his family began to grow vegetables. From…

More here: http://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/society/farm-fresh-from-home-in-kozhikode/article6686308.ece

These Green Roofs Are More Than Just A Garden, They’re Also A Power Plant

Green roofs produce food, cool buildings, and add a dash of color to the skyline. In the future, could they also generate electricity?

That’s the vision of Marjolein Helder and her Dutch startup Plant-e. Helder has developed a modular system that generates power from submerged plant roots. Eventually, it could power whole households, she says.

More here: http://www.fastcoexist.com/3039194/these-green-roofs-are-more-than-just-a-garden-theyre-also-a-power-plant