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HOME»NEWS»EARTH»AGRICULTURE»FARMING English farmers could grow commercial GM crops for first time

A landmark ruling by the European Parliament is this week expected to give ministers the power to approve genetically modified crops.

Prof Jonathan Napier with very small crop of GM Camelina Genetically modified crops: Q&A

Professor John Napier with one of the trial crops of GM Camelina being grown in England Photo: PAUL GROVER

On Tuesday the European Parliament is expected to approve a deal which will let countries decide for themselves whether they want to plant GM crops.

The new legislation, which will be in place by Spring, could mean that commercial GM crops including maize and oil seed rape are grown in Britain.

The crops, which have been genetically modified to produce higher yields and withstand higher concentrations of weedkiller, would be sold for animal feed or to produce energy.

It raises the prospect that genetically modified fruit and vegetables could ultimately be grown for sale in Britain’s supermarkets.

Read more here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/agriculture/farming/11336184/English-farmers-could-grow-commercial-GM-crops-for-first-time.html

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GMO Farmer: ‘I Won’t Eat My Own Crops’

Thanks to Monsanto, he feels he has no choice

By Christina Sarich

Like a thousand other farmers across the US, Kirk Bair is a farmer looking for ways to grow food economically and with as little labor as possible – but what are the moral implications of planting food you are aware is toxic, and selling it to your friends and neighbors? Is Bair in the right for planting GMO seed, even if conventional seed is hard to come by?

Bair has said:

“When you put a herbicide gene inside a corn seed, soybean, wheat, whatever you’re working with, you’re eating that. You’re ingesting it.”

It is clear that Bair realizes the health dangers of GM crops, but he plants them anyway? Why? He feels he has no choice, and there is a multi-billion dollar industry calling the shots.

“I’ve got some good looking ears coming,” said Kirk Bair, admiring his genetically modified corn crop, developed with Monsanto’s technology.

When asked why he has planted GM corn, Blair states:

“To use conventional corn, non-GMO, I’d have to till, apply pre-emergence herbicide. It’s more economical and more convenient to use GMO corn on real ground. I only use it because I felt like I had to. My seed supplier said, ‘Kirk it’s harder and harder to get a hold of conventional seed.’”

Read more here: http://www.globalresearch.ca/gmo-farmer-i-wont-eat-my-own-crops/5423371

How to Explain GMO labeling to Kids: Billy Nye!

If we genetically modify out food, say by taking a gene from a fish, and putting it into the tomato, we’re creating a whole new species.

If we genetically modify out food, say by taking a gene from a fish, and putting it into the tomato, we’re creating a whole new species.

I subbed in a fourth grade classroom recently. During a science lesson on electricity, the teacher has me show an old Bill Nye the Science Guy video.  I had forgotten about the goofy Mr. Nye, but the kids were enthralled and entertained.  We had a great discussion after the video building on what the children knew about electric cars and alternative energy.

Bill Nye is still delivering accessible science information to children.  I recently came across a video shared onRodale News about GMOs and GMO Labeling.

Read and see more here: http://ecochildsplay.com/2015/01/02/how-to-explain-gmo-labeling-to-kids-billy-nye/